The 8th Practical Beekeeping Course – June 21/22, 2014

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Participants from June 21/22, 2014 course in Practical Beekeeping.

 

 

Once again, the weather favoured us with sunshine and a cooling breeze.

A full complement of new beekeepers joined us at Tanglewood Honey to learn the practical aspects of keeping bees alive and healthy, and to discover how gentle they can be.

 

Here’s some of what they shared after the course.

“I loved the whole vibe of the surroundings…”

“…bees are beautiful, amazing, intelligent creatures. I could really do this!”

“…excellent experience, a really useful education!”

“very engaging! 10/10, and fun!”

“No-one should start a beekeeping business without this course or one just like it.”

“I think the ‘Disease and What to Do’ portion is most useful, as it will happen.”

“…nice mix of inside and outside.”

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Break from class! Kitting up for the beeyard.

Plan to register early for courses in the spring 2015, so you don’t miss out.

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Here’s what people are saying about the June course…

June 6/7 was our first course of 2014, and the weather was fantastic! We are grateful to our participants for their feedback on the program. We are always trying to make the course suit the needs of new beekeepers.

Here is some of what they said:

“The passion for your lifestyle – beekeeping and gardening – is so incredibly motivating and inspiring. It was beyond a learning opportunity and into a valuable and treasured experience that I will never forget”.

“I found everything fascinating and very exciting. I don’t think Jim missed a thing”.

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June 7/8 2014 – course participants

“I am not afraid of getting stung by a bee, and I think the practical side of the course, handling the bees, helped build that confidence”.

“This course is relaxing and information packed!”

“I feel very confident. I know I will have a lot of questions but now I feel equipped with the resources on how to get answers”.

 

 

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Introduction to Beekeeping Course – Spring 2014

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Two day workshop for $185

June 7/8  –  Please register by May 15, 2014

(If sufficient registration – we will offer a second weekend on June 21/22)

 Hands on learning

Please send a note describing your experience and interest in bees with your payment. Make cheques payable to Jim Anderson.

Not appropriate for those with bee allergies.

Note – for the beeyard session on Day Two, you will require a veil, gloves and coveralls.

Call Jim with your questions.

613 628 2890

Comments from 2012 Workshop Participants

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“Absolutely met and exceeded my expectations”.

“I feel very well informed and especially feel confident because the beekeeping course inspired great community sharing and I feel that I have great resources just a phone call DSC00043away”.

“I greatly appreciate the flow to the two days”.

“I would absolutely encourage others to attend any workshops that either Jim or Alice decided to offer. The wealth of information between the two of you is absolutely essential as a new beekeeper”.

“Thank you to both of you!! Wonderful to be a part of Tanglewood for the past two days!! Thank you!!”.

“…very well organized and carried out. One topic flowed into the next”.

“This course is needed by most new beekeepers”.

“I really enjoyed handling the bees on the second day. It made everything I learned real”.

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Ready for Spring?

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Two day workshop for $185

June 7/8  –  Please register by May 15, 2014

(If sufficient registration – we will offer a second weekend on June 21/22)

 Hands on learning

Please send a note describing your experience and interest in bees with your payment. Make cheques payable to Jim Anderson.

Not appropriate for those with bee allergies.

Note – for the beeyard session on Day Two, you will require a veil, gloves and coveralls.

Call Jim with your questions.

613 628 2890

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Introduction to Beekeeping Course – Spring 2013

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Two day workshop for $185

June 1/2 or June 15/16 (register by May 15, 2013)

 Hands on learning

Please send a note describing your experience and interest in bees with your payment. Make cheques payable to Jim Anderson.

Not appropriate for those with bee allergies.

Note – for the beeyard session on Day Two, you will require a veil, gloves and coveralls.

Call Jim with your questions.

613 628 2890

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We’re thinking of Spring

When the golden sun has driven winter to ground
And opened up all the leagues of the sky in summer light,
Over the glades and woodlands at once they love to wander
And suck the shining flowers and delicate sip the streams.
Sweet then is their strange delight
As they cherish their children, their nestlings: then with craftsmanship they
Hammer out the fresh wax and mold the tacky honey.
Then, as you watch the swarm bursting from hive and heavenward
Soaring, and floating there on the limpid air of summer –
A vague and wind-warped column of cloud to your wondering eyes: -
Notice them, how they always make for fresh water and leafy
Shelter. Here you shall sprinkle fragrances to their taste –
Crushed balm, honeywort humble.

Virgil circa 50 BC

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Honey Gatherers and Beekeepers

For more than a million years, human beings have been interacting with honeybees. Only in the last couple of hundred years has beekeeping really taken off with the invention, by the Rev. L.L. Langstroth in 1851, of the moveable frame, and “super” – or bee box. Before that revolution in the practice of beekeeping, for centuries, the bee colony was generally destroyed in the process of separating bees from honey and harvesting the crop.  While bee behaviour has changed little, thank goodness humans have learned the art of harvesting honey without harming the honey-makers, thanks to Rev. Langstroth!

John comes in to say we must take the honey from the bees, so he to the making of sulfer paper which he do put too near the fire, it flaring up did burne his fingers, therby he did drop all on clean hearth stone, and did dance about like a bee in a bottle. I did put some butter on his fingers to stop the smarting thereon, but he did make a mighty fuss.     Sarah [the maid] did scrape up the stuff from the hearth stone and cleaned it, but it be stained and do smell very nasty. Later, carter’s wife did come and make a goodly pile of the papers, and so we now already to take the honey on tomorrow.

Original Oil Painting by Paul Smith

And the day after next . . .

We did have a busy time taking the honey from the bees  yesternight. Me and Sarah and carter’s wife did have to do it all, John saying his fingers being very sore from the burns.

   Sarah did dig a big hole in the ground for each skep, wherein we did put a sulfur paper which we did set alight, and put the skep of bees on the top, the smell of the sulfur do kill the bees, and so we do get the honey there from. It do grieve me to kill the poor things, being such a waste of good bees, to lie in a great heap at the bottom of the hole when the skep be took off it, but we do want the honey, using a great lot in the house for divers times. Carter’s wife did fall backwards and sat in a skep of bees, which did make a great buzzing and did send her youping out of the garden, at which Sarah did laff so heartily to see carter’s wife holding up her gown while jumping over the cabbidges, that she did nearly do the same thing, at which I quite helpless to reprove her, laffing myself at the carter’s wife spindly legs abobbing up and down among the vegetables. She back anon, with a mighty big nose where a bee had sat on it, and we to the out house with the honey skeps, there to leave them till sure all the bees be gone.

   We shall break the honey combs up and hang it up in a clean cotton bag to run it through then we shall strain it divers times and when clear put the pots reddie to use. The wax we do boil many times till it be a nice yaller colour and no bits of black in it, when it can be stored for use  for the polishing and harness cleaning.

“Extract of an English housewife’s diary, September 28, 1796 Honey”,

A Comprehensive Survey, ed. Crane, 1975

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